Golf is Great for Teenagers

A golf course is a great place to be a teenager. It’s the sort of environment most adolescents need as they begin the transition to adulthood. During one’s formative years it’s important to have a laboratory for learning. Every hole is an opportunity to discover something new about life. Golf teaches many things that young people will prosper from knowing. Patience, perseverance, self-belief, and courteousness to name a few. Playing with contemporaries and other acquaintances strengthen friendships and create conversational skills. Golf reveals a certain grit too. It’s a fine sport for developing personality and character as well. The teenager tends to think they know a lot, but hours spent failing at golf will prove otherwise. It’s good to be humbled regularly and golf will do that with ease. Young people need places for exploring who they are. A long walk in pursuit of a perplexing game does just the trick. Teenagers long for freedom and a golf course can offer that in a way that works for both them and their guardians. There is just enough room to roam without becoming lost. A golfer is a good thing to be and the teenage years are a fine time to become one.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

Some Swings Before Work

Golf in the morning is sure to make any day much improved. Especially if it happens before work. There’s something about swinging through the dew that makes me want to get things done. Maybe it’s the sights and sounds of the course coming together around me. Meditations under a morning sun are good for focusing the mind. It only takes a few holes to get my conscience in line with my ambitions and from that clarity strategies for business start to form. Golf is an underrated mechanism for charting a productive day. As much as I adore ending my evenings on the course, starting a day there is a different sort of dopamine hit. Instead of relaxing after work, the object of the early morning outing is more akin to a check up on my determination. With a full schedule ahead, a quickened pace is needed, and finishing on time is the first accomplishment of the day. Getting the heart rate up helps to set the tone for the work that needs to happen later. In this sense, dawn patrol is a wonderful window of time for golf. When there is much to do, those hours may be the only ones available for the game. I’ve often profited from such walks when all I could do is swing, walk, and repeat in a timely way. In those dew-covered steps I find a rhythm for my daily requirements. Work starts as soon as I start thinking about it and a few holes with coffee is a great way to fall into the cadence of a busy day. The focus needed for golf is easily transferred to other projects. If I can scratch my itch for this early, then the rest of the day is left to get things done.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

Give It Everything You Got

Some golf holes require a mighty swing. These are the sort where in order to score well a bold move must be made. Every course deserves a moment or two that challenge the limits of a player’s ability. A smooth turn works in most instances, but certain holes demand a bit more gusto. A big carry or sharp dogleg may be the instigating scenario here. There is always a high risk of failure involved in these tense scenarios. Hazards and hillocks may be scattered about and doom may seem certain. Knowing that an ejection can occur is a powerful motivation to abandon any trepidation though. There’s only one way to manage this. With no safe harbor in sight, the golfer must conjure up a confident swing to overcome an uncertain result. A decisive strike is needed to avoid the potential pitfalls placed on the hole. These shots will cause all sorts of trouble for the golfer who can’t stay focused. Too much thinking will turn things sideways in a hurry. It’s better to grab a trusted club and swing it with authority. Make a lashing blow down and through the ball. Moving onward to the target with a high finish and hope for a fine result. Shots like this are what make golf interesting. Give it everything you got.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

It’s Good To Be a Grinder

Most golf rounds are a grind. Every shot is a battle against bogey and it is hard to stay in that mindset hole after hole. For the majority of amateurs, managing misses is just a way of life though. Finding a way to turn off-center swings into a string of pars is a real skill. Honestly, it’s much more impressive than the monotonous player’s rhythm of hitting fairways and greens. It takes constant concentration to keep scores low when the ball doesn’t behave the way you’d like. Through some combination of strategy and scrambling, pars can be manufactured from a myriad of challenging positions. Leaving shots in places with room to recover is a key element of that thinking. Steering away from hazards and staying below the hole are smart moves too. Golfers who make many birdies set themselves up with booming drives and well-struck approaches. The par saver makes their hay by knowing where miss-hits are most likely to go. Chips, putts, punches, and sand saves are all important parts of that repertoire. The best grinders take a great deal of pride in this work. And it most certainly is work. There are indeed days where things go more according to plan, but the law of averages usually yields an outing with many difficulties. In this reality, golf can often feel more like a mining operation than leisure. However, there is much to appreciate about hard-fought pars. It’s good to be a grinder.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

Start With What Matters Most

The best place to teach a new golfer how to play the game is right by the hole. They need to learn the most essential skill first. Give them a putter and help them figure out how to get the ball in the cup. There’s not much point in taking full swings until some putting ability is developed. This may sound counterintuitive, but it isn’t. Putting is often seen as the odd part of golf, but it’s actually the more foundational portion of the game. Getting the ball in the hole is the object of golf and that’s achieved with the flat stick. When someone learns this first, it changes how they see the larger game. So many golfers never figure out how to finish a hole and that makes the game less enjoyable. Teach someone how to become a putter and they’ll grow into a golfer. Start with what matters most.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

Friends Worth Playing With

Finding good golf friends is an important part of the game. In some ways, it’s a lot like dating. You’ll play with lots of people before you find the right fit. It’s good to look for players with similar interests and skill sets, but it may be even more valuable to discover an elevated sense of humor. A desire for adventure and fellowship is rather meaningful too. Some partners will come and go, but over time there will be a few that you just can’t shake. Through many walks the experiences you share become strong bonds. The memorable swings and competitive matches keep things interesting while the bad shots and head-shaking jokes ensure no round is a bore. Golf pals make for cheap entertainment, but they can be costly to keep. There will be trips taken, bets lost, and bar tabs overextended. It’s all worth it though. Having a tribe of golfers who seek to enjoy the world together is a wonderful thing. The laughs, chats, and long evenings celebrating the game are exactly why golf is so fun. The time spent searching for friendship is always worth it. We need partners in golf just as we do in life.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

My More Admirable Self

Every time I walk a golf course I learn more about my presence in the world. Through my decades in this game, I’ve come to have a thorough understanding of what my best and worst qualities are. They often emerge from me as different personas. My daily life can seem like a seesaw with those angels and demons sitting on each side. Golf is how I measure which one is more dominant. However, when I play, a sort of re-balancing happens. By looking inside I can find the levers which need to be adjusted in order to bring me closer to my better self. This is important work. In order to do it, I need quiet, calm, and peaceful surroundings. Focus matters too. A golf course is ideally suited for such reflection. The walk leads me back to my more admirable self. I’m still learning how to improve so I keep coming back to golf. It is a journey with no end in sight.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

You Earned That View

When the ball sails through the sky and your eyes focus on the fast-flying orb, there is a feeling of calm that comes from confirming its direction. There is both pride and peacefulness found in delivering the ball to its target. It’s more than just appreciating the result of a particular swing though. The seasoned player quietly celebrates the success of each shot because they remember all the work and time it took to realize it. Achievements in golf are not measured on the scales of swings, holes, and scores — it’s the years spent crafting your game that counts most. Golf is for the patient. Dedication matters. The difference between good and great comes from devotion. Golf is a practice. You can never perfect it, but you can learn to play the game with great proficiency. It’s not easy, but the work is worth it. The payoff happens each time you find a fairway, hit the green, and hole a putt. That’s why you stare down each and every result. You earned that view.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

See It and Do It

In golf, we can shape our outcomes, but first we must believe. In order to produce a desired result we have to be able to clearly see what we want. Our abilities are only limited by the strength of our imagination. To execute a shot we have to envision what it should be. It’s shape, distance, and trajectory should all be mapped out in the mind before a club is even selected. The swing is merely a means for bringing this vision to life. Once we have seen the shot play out in our thoughts, we simply have to allow it into existence. Affirmations of this sort are powerful tools for the golfer. With a profound belief in our ability and a clear picture of what we want to produce, any shot can be achieved. When we see it, we can do it.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J

Let the Hill Be Your Friend

Downhill lies require an elevated level of attention. It’s the alignment that’s the hardest thing to get right. Being on a slope makes for interesting golf, but without proper consideration a misfired shot can easily become the result. It is in these unbalanced situations where good feel pays off. Developing an ability to position the body in line with the camber of the ground is key. You can’t fight the hill, you have to swing with it. Through your feet, torso, and shoulder, there must be a sense of connection to the angle for which the ball lies. By creating one continuous plane you can swing in a normal fashion and generate an impressive result. Those who overthink this scenario are bound to make a mistake. By calibrating your body to respond to the incline, a good turn is all that is needed. The trajectory may be influenced of course, but the only thing that matters is where the ball winds up. Despite what may look like a daunting ball position the results can work in your favor if you just get lined up properly. Let the hill be your friend.


If you enjoy these daily stories, you might like my new book, The Nine Virtues of Golf. It debuted earlier this Summer as the #1 new release golf book on Amazon.

-J